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I'm an online instructor at the University of Oklahoma, happily teaching courses in Mythology & Folklore (#OU3043) and Indian Epics (#OU4993).

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Laura Gibbs

Week 14 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for  Myth-Folklore 

The big event of this week was... KRAMPUS. Lots going on, including this article in the Atlantic: Krampus: The Dark Companion of Saint Nick. Lots of people I know online were sharing Krampus items, and my favorite was this one: Krampus in a motor car!

 

I also did some reading (prompted by outraged tweets that someone shared re: Univ. of Utrecht) about "Black Pete," the companion of Sinter Claus. Eegad, what a complicated cultural mess that is. The use of blackface is pretty dreadful... but does that mean the whole tradition gets tossed out? Wkipedia has a detailed article: Zwarte Piet. Here he is, black (not blackface) in Moorish clothing, with St. Nikolaas circa 1850:

 

And let us not forget... the Yule Goat!!! There is even a Yule Goat Webcam, and here is more about that goat at Wikipedia... with a depiction by one of my favorite illustrators, John Bauer:

 

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 14 Indian Epics Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Indian Epics

It's not quite the end of the semester yet, but I decided to give myself the special treat of starting a new audiobook and I was thrilled to find a book by Amish Tripathi at Audible.com! It's Oath of the Vayuputras:

 

I'm working on a new "Elephant" unit for the Myth-Folklore class but of course many of the stories for that unit are from India. I love chain tales, so of course I was delighted to find this chain tale: The Little Blackbird from E.M. Gordon's Indian Folk Tales: Being Side-lights on Village Life in Bilaspore, Central Provinces (1908). This is an Indian blackbird:

 

I was also delighted to find this blog post (thanks to my friend Vanessa at Google+): In Search of Indian Comics (Part One): Folk Roots and Traditions by Henry Jenkins - see the blog post for lots of great illustrations like this one from the contemporary graphic novel, Bhimayana: Incidents in the Life of Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar:

Laura Gibbs

Week 13 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Myth-Folklore

STAR TREK. I read a great essay in the Los Angeles Review of Books online: Who Tends to Captain Picard’s Bromeliads? by Michael Miles. It's a thought-provoking and critical view of Star Trek's post-scarcity economy (where are the robots who do all the work?)... and hey, how many times do you ever see the word bromeliad in print, eh? Bromeliads are pretty flowering plants:

 

STATUE OF LIBERTY. I thought this account of the creation of the Statue of Liberty was really fascinating. Egypt is part of the story: The Statue of Liberty Was Originally a Muslim Woman. Here's a photo of the statue's head (and that's Nancy Reagan waving a flag):

 

HARRY POTTER. I'm a regular reader of audio books, and I use the Audible.com service. I've been a member since the company started, so for about 15 years... and I've been waiting for the Harry Potter books to arrive. And now they have! I am going to enjoy getting to listen to these books in audio form!

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 13 Indian Epics Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Indian Epics

GAJENDRA. I worked on the legend of the Gajendra Moksha for the Elephant Unit in Myth-Folklore class, and I was really happy with how that turned out; I even edited the Wikipedia article about Gajendra, and then I found a wonderful YouTube video with the Gajendra Mantra, with the Sanskrit words transliterated and translated here.

PATTANAIK - SITA. This is physical curation rather than digital... but I finally got my copy of Pattanaik's Sita book, and I am really excited about reading this over the break. I wish it were available as an ebook!

VEDABASE: BHAGAVATA PURANA. I continue to be amazed at the resources available at the VedaBase website, especially its edition of the Bhagavata Purana. If the whole thing were printed out it would take many volumes, as you can see from the picture here. What's really cool is the way it is presented: you can just read the summary chapter by chapter, along with the verses in English, or you can click on each individual verse and see the Sanskrit, a transliteration, a glossary, plus the commentary. Amazing!

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 12 Indian Epics Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Indian Epics

I found a very handy book at Amazon, just $3 for the KindleThe Complete Mahabharata in a Nutshell by V. K. Balakrishnan. What a useful book! I wrote out all the book subheadings to make it easier to search.

 

DHANTERAS. One of the holidays associated with Diwali is Dhanteras, a holiday associated with wealth, prosperity, and the goddess Lakshmi. I really enjoyed all the Dhanteras greetings at Twitter, many of which featured the feet of the goddess Lakshmi along with su-astikas (swastikas) as you can see here, and you can learn more about Dhanteras at Wikipedia:

 

I really enjoyed this National Geographic Traveler: India article about dance traditions with masks: Seven Masked Dances You Can Watch In India by Rumela Basu.

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 12 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Myth-Folklore

From a friend at Google+ I learned about this great resource: Names of the Winds. There are names here from ancient traditions (like Greek Zephyr), Native American wind names, all kinds of good stuff.

Following up on Ben Carson and those Egyptian pyramids, there's a nice article at Atlas Obscura about the history of improbable theories about the Egyptian pyramids: Secret Chambers, Grain Silos And The Long, Long History Of Pyramid Conspiracy Theories by Maggie Koerth-Baker. 

And of the many mythological Ben Carson memes making the rounds, here are two of my favorites: one for Easter Island and one for the Great Wall of China (I followed the  hashtag ... it spawned a lot of mythologizing memes last week!).

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 11 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

Here is my new post for Myth-Folklore

From an Italian friend at Google+ I learned about Camille Renversade, whose blog you can see here: Mon Cabinet de Curiosités. Amazing! I learned that he is the author of Créatures fantastiques. Here is a page from that book:

 

From the British Library comes this marvelous illustration from the adventures of Bahram Gur. You can read more about Nizami's Bahram Guru here.

Here's a detail of that dragon:

 

And from the Google Art Project, here's an exhibit on Heaven, Hell, and Dying Well in the Middle Ages:

That's where i found this gorgeous Harrowing of Hell from around the year 1200 (at the Getty):

Laura Gibbs

Week 11 Indian Epics Curation

2 min read

Here is my new post for Indian Epics

GRAPHIC NOVELS AT SCRIBD. Thanks to Josh in class, I learned that Scribd has some of the Campfire (India) graphic novels available: so, you are just $1 away from owning your own digital copy of Ekalavya or Sundarkaand (Hanuman), and $3 away from owning your own digital copy of Krishna: Defender of Dharma. I've added links to the Scribd record for each graphic novel. Maybe that will lead to some more people reading these great graphic novels for class. I wish they had all the Campfire graphic novels, but I could only find these three:

 

MORE GODS AND GODDESSES. I've been working on writing up notes to Devdutt Pattanaik's Calendar Art videos, and as a result I've come across all kinds of wonderful images at Wikipedia. For reasons he explains in the author's note, Pattanaik uses black-and-white images in the book, but Wikipedia has many gorgeous color images for those of us who miss all the lovely colors!

For example, here is an image of Balaji (Vishnu) in a temple in Pontiac, Michigan of all places! You can read about Balaji and his debt to Kubera at Wikipedia:

 

BATTLESTAR GALACTICA: GAYATRI. I'm a huge fan of Battlestar Galactica, and so of course I was excited to make up this page with a traditional Gayatri performance (from Ravi Shankar's Chants of India), along with a couple of Battlestar Galactica videos. You can see/hear all those videos here; below is the theme music from the Battlestar Galactica movie, The Plan, where you can hear the mantra most clearly:

 

Brynn Simons

The Ramayana in Disney's, "A Little Princess."

1 min read

This is perhaps my earliest exposure to the Ramayana and Hindu mythology. I remember watching the movie many times with my older sister. Many of my parents friends thought my sister looked like the main character from the movie at her age. I thought it would be interesting to see what others think of this live-action interpretation of the story, despite the fact it's only getting served to the audience in bits and pieces throughout the main story. Link to youtube if embedding isn't working: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgxMHxeOfNE