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Laura Gibbs

Week 6 Curation: Reading, Writing, and Language

1 min read

In the previous weeks, I did curation that was related to the content of my courses and ... but this week I thought I would grab three of the reading, writing, and language items that I've come across in the past few weeks. Those are important for my classes too!

I absolutely LOVE this video about books and libraries which someone shared at Google+ just last week. You can read the lyrics at this blog post:

 

For National Punctuation Day on September 24, there were all kinds of fun shares at Twitter, like this great chart by Adrienne Crezo and Mike Rogalski from Mental Floss:

 

And from this collection of fantastic posters — Awe-inspiring book charts you’ll want to hang on the wall — I really liked Parts of Speech explained through books, movies, and music.

Here is the nouns section:

And here is the whole poster:

Laura Gibbs

Week 5 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

As before, I'm grabbing one item from the Known stream, one from Pinterest, and one from Twitter.

My favorite Known post was about one of my favorite Japanese folktale characters: the trickster tanuki! I made a Flickr Gallery with photos that people had posted of tanukis there. Here's a screenshot of the thumbnails: Tanuki Gallery at Flickr.

My favorite thing that I pinned for Myth-Folklore was this 1911 film of Dante's Inferno that I learned about via Open Culture:

My favorite item Twitter was this collection of mermaid images: A (Tail) Flap of Mermaids. There are some wonderful images here; I like this one by Walter Crane the best: The Mermaid Dance, c. 1880s.

 

 

 

 

Laura Gibbs

Tanuki Gallery at Flickr

1 min read

I am a big fan of Flickr, especially creating embedded slideshows of my own images (that's what you can see in the sidebar of the Growth Mindset Memes blog, for example).

If you want to search for and save other people's photos, you can do that in a Gallery. You cannot embed a Gallery, but you can link to it, and it also has a Lightbox option. To see how those options work, I did a gallery of TANUKI pictures since the Japanese tanuki is part of the Japanese folklore that comes up this week in .

Here is a link to my gallery: Tanuki Gallery, and here's a link to the Lightbox view

Here's a screenshot of the thumbnails:

Take a look at the Tanuki Gallery to see the full size images!

And you can find out more about tanukis at Wikipedia.

And here's a tanuki from Wikimedia:

 

Laura Gibbs

Greek Myth Comix: Hercules

1 min read

The Greek Myth Comix site is full of great stuff, like this comic from a series on the childhood of Heracles ... visit the site to see the complete comic.

 

 

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 4 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

As before, I'm grabbing one item from the Known stream, one from Pinterest, and one from Twitter.

My favorite Known item is this lovely exhibit from the State Library of Victoria (Australia): Love and Devotion from Persia and Beyond. There are so many great stories and images here!


My favorite item pinned at PInterest was this item from Digital Public Library of America: The map of famous pirates Buccaneers and Freebooters, who roamed the seas during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. You can see a larger view here.

Here is a detail view:


And my favorite item that I found via Twitter is this interactive map of Odysseus's Odyssey:

Laura Gibbs

Love and Devotion from Persia and Beyond

1 min read

I was enchanted by some images which William Dalrymple shared at Twitter today from the story of Bahram Gur; here is one of them:

 

Then, when I Googled Bahram Gur to find some additional resources, I found this lovely exhibit from the State Library of Victoria (Australia): Love and Devotion from Persia and Beyond.

 

It contains sections devoted to some beautiful Persian stories and poems: The Shahnama, Bahram Gur, Iskandar, Conference of the Birds, Khusrau and Shirin, Layla and Majnun, Yusuf and Zulaykha, 1001 Nights, and the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.

And just look at this astounding image gallery! Here is just one example: it is Iskandar (Alexander the Great) and the talking tree. You can read the story here: Iskandar at the Talking Tree.

Laura Gibbs

Moreau: Hercules and the Hydra

1 min read

A friend at Google+ shared a painting by Gustave Moreau today, so I have been thinking about Moreau today. He is one of my favorite artists. What a pleasure it would be to teach a course in mythology based on his paintings! WikiArt.org is a good place to start exploring his genius work. Here is an extraordinary one: his vision of Hercules and the Hydra! Wow!

 

Laura Gibbs

Ursula LeGuin: One of the World's Great Storytellers

1 min read

My favorite books in junior high were Ursula LeGuin's beautiful Earthsea triology novels, especially The Tombs of Atuan. In the decades since then, I've read most of her novels, and many of them I have read again and again. My all-time favorite: The Lathe of Heaven. She's even written a novel inspired by Virgil's Aeneid, but focused instead on the heroine: Lavinia.

She has a new book out — Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story — and as a result of this book, there are interviews and book reviews too, like this interview with Ursula LeGuin at Interview Magazine, and this book review at Slate: Unlearning to Write — Ursula Le Guin’s guide to the impossible craft of storytelling.

I also really enjoyed this NPR radio interview she did with Scott Simon recently: 

This is the cover that the paperback had back in the 1970s when I first read The Tombs of Atuan:

Laura Gibbs

Week 3 Myth-Folklore Curation

1 min read

As before, I'm grabbing one item from the Known stream, one from Pinterest, and one from Twitter.

From Known, a post about Mark Twain's hilarious Diary of Eve (with Adam's Diary also). Mark Twain would have fit right into the spirit of this class. :-)

Eve's Diary by Mark Twain

(also containing extracts of Adam's Diary)

 

From Pinterest, I pinned my friend Dirk Puehl's post about the amazing illustration, Arthur Rackham, including this illustration for Peter Pan in Kensington Gardens:

And my favorite discovery at Twitter was this illustration for the Sanskrit classic, sometimes known as Vikram and the Vampire; it's called Twenty-Two Goblins in the Myth-Folklore UnTextbook unti that some people may be reading this week!

Laura Gibbs

Selkie Story

1 min read

Some of you who have been researching mermaids in Myth-Folklore may have run into the term selkie. Selkies are magical seals that live in the sea, but they can take off their seal-skins and become human. For more information, see Wikipedia

From the Europeana Sounds project, here is a recording from 1973 by a man from the Shetland Isles, Andrew Irvine, telling the story of a man who took a selkie as his wife:

 

 

Selkie, by by Carolyn Emerick.