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Laura Gibbs

Week 4 Indian Epics Curation

1 min read

Here is one item each from Twitter, Known, and Pinterest for this week's for

My favorite item that I saved here at Known is this great "Death of Kumbhakarna" image from the British Library! I really like this style of painting which is like an animation as you see Kumbhakarna dismembered arrow by arrow and then crashing to the ground. 


My favorite item that I pinned at PInterest is this Wikipedia article about the Savitri Brata, a festival inspired by the story of Savitri and Satyavan. It will be celebrated on May 17 this year:

 

And my favorite item that I found via Twitter is this marvelous painting of Ravana shaking Shiva and his family on Mount Kailash:

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 3 Indian Epics Curation

1 min read

Here is one item each from Twitter, Known, and Pinterest for this week's for

From a friend at Google+ I was reminded to pin the Talking Myths website, which is a collection of traditional Indian stories of all kinds - such a lovely site to browse!

 

Earlier this week here at Known, I shared this Google ad... the power of Google to connect India and Pakistan, telling a story in just a few video minutes. #

 

 

From Twitter, my favorite item was this beautiful painting of Shiva, Parvati, and Nandi:

Laura Gibbs

Week 2 Curation: Indian Epics

2 min read

Like last week, I'm posting here one item from my Indian Epics Pinterest Board, one item from my Indian Epics Twitter stream, and one item from Indian Epics Known as my contribution for this week.

At Pinterest, I pinned the website of Olivia Fraser who has shared some remarkable paintings at her website: oliviafraser.com. I especially liked this one, which is called Darshan. You can read about this important word, meaning a kind of miraculous sight or divine apparition, at Wikipedia: Darshan.

 

At Twitter, I loved this image of Shiva and the holy family singing and dancing together. You can see Shiva (who is Nataraja, Lord of the Dance), his elephant-headed son Ganesha, his beloved Parvati, and his other son Kartikeya (I am not sure who is playing the trumpet; I would have expected Shiva'a vahana, the bull Nandi, to be present, but alas, he is not):

My favorite thing here at the Known has to be the Storify of the convo I had with Josh in class... which Devdutt Pattanaik actually retweeted! (gasp) He is one of my favorite Indian authors, so it was very cool to be connected to him via Twitter, and I shared both the Storify and the retweet in this Known post. Here is the screenshot of the retweet:

 

Laura Gibbs

Week 1 Curation: Indian Epics

2 min read

I just picked my three for Myth-Folklore this week, and here are my three for Indian Epics . This doesn't start for class until Week 2, but it's already so hard to choose just three that I wanted to do a post already this week. Like for Myth-Folklore, I am going to help limit myself by choosing just one from Pinterest, one from Twitter, and one from the stream here at Known.

From my Indian Epics Pinterest Board, I am choosing this post at Atlas Obscura (which is a website I really like): How Gandhi's Ashes Landed in Los Angeles. This was something I had never heard. If i had known about this when I was in LA in June, I would have tried to go. Gandhi's ashes were indeed poured into the Ganga river, but thre were also urns with some of his ashes sent throughout India for local ceremonies. One of those urns ended up in the possession of Yogi Paramahansa Yogananda, who was Gandhi's yoga teacher in 1930s, who placed them in a memorial at the Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine in Pacific Palisades. You can read all about that in the article; here is a picture:

 

From the Twitter stream for , I chose this YouTube music video by Anoushka Shankar and Karsh Kale: Abyss, from their album Breathing Under Water (and yes, that is Sting singing the vocals). More about this beautiful album at Wikipedia:

 

And here at the Known stream for I saved this share from Chitra Divakaruni (yes, the author of Palace of Illusions!!! I follow her at Twitter, and she shares great stuff here); it's a saying of the great Indian writer Rabindranath Tagore; for details, see the Known post.

Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark